The truth about Gartner

Lots of talk this week about objectivity (here), (here), (here), and (here) and the value of analysts firms. Mike over at Episteme even goes so far as to proclaim his site the “un-analyst” firm (here) – cute.

What people seem to not realize is that as an analyst I spoke to on average several dozen large enterprise companies, in almost every vertical, in almost every geography around the world and I did this every week. Couple this with access to 700 other analysts who do the same thing, add in access to what all the vendors are doing, plus the fact that we spend our time doing nothing but looking at specific problem/solution sets, plus all the analysts I worked with have extensive experience in the industry to begin with, for example I joined Gartner after spending close to a dozen years with vendors developing security solutions. I think it is pretty obvious that Gartner is able to gain insight into markets, trends, and strategies that most are not – that breadth and depth of knowledge is very difficult to replicate without the support of a large firm.

As for a pattern of people leaving – The Gartner security team has roughly 25 analysts,of those 2 have left in the last 5 years. Of the 700 analysts at Gartner it is less than 10. I am sure if I used similar statistics to make a statement about patterns in OS security Thomas would tear me to bits, but claiming there is a pattern and insinuating that there is an issue with analysts objectivity or limited value is very much out of line (admittedly Thomas didn’t say anything about limited value, but others have)

The truth about Gartner is they have a massive infrastructure, hundreds of extremely talented analysts, and a global reach to support the level of insight that organizations require to navigate the tactical and strategic IT initiatives that face an increasingly complex, global, and sophisticated environments.

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